How do bees make honey?


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The largest factory in the world



Now that China is nearing its goal—in about 15 years China’s middle class will outnumber the entire population of the United States—it has an excess of steel and is exporting that excess at lower prices to other countries creating stiff competition across the globe. For instance, the ISSB reports that from 2013 to 2014 China increased its steel exports by 53% from 57.9 million to 88.6 million tonnes while the United States saw a 5% drop in its steel exports.

With the United States so obsessed to be #1 in everything—except for reducing the poverty rate—its capitalist oligarchs must be obsessively stressed out and worried that they are going to lose their Imperial crowns.

Singel Bees


Bees range in size from tiny stingless bee species whose workers are less than 2 millimetres (0.08 in) long, toMegachile pluto, the largest species of leafcutter bee, whose females can attain a length of 39 millimetres (1.54 in). The most common bees in the Northern Hemisphere are the Halictidae, or sweat bees, but they are small and often mistaken for wasps or flies. Vertebrate predators of bees include birds such as bee-eaters; insect predators include beewolves and dragonflies.

Behaviourally, one of the most obvious characteristics of bees is that they collect pollen to provide provisions for their young, and have the necessary adaptations to do this. However, certain wasp species such as pollen wasps have similar behaviours, and a few species of bee scavenge from carcases to feed their offspring.[22] The world’s largest species of bee is thought to be the Indonesian resin bee Megachile pluto, whose females can attain a length of 39 millimetres (1.54 in).[23] The smallest species may be dwarf stingless bees in the tribe Meliponini whose workers are less than 2 millimetres (0.08 in) in length.[24]

Curiosity’s Seven Minutes of Terror


Note: Curiosity is a Mars rover launched by NASA on November 26, 2011. Currently en route to the planet, it is scheduled to land in Gale Crater on August 5, 2012 ( US Pacific time) . The rover’s objectives include searching for past or present life, studying the Martian climate, studying Martian geology, and collecting data for a future manned mission to Mars. It will explore Mars for 2 years.

“Thanks for the video and explaining the landing procedure. I was wondering why the NASA group was unusually excited when Curiosity landed..tears, lots of hugs and handshaking..a huge sigh of relief. This explains why.”
Melissa Atkins, has said

The classroom, but not as we know it


IT’S the kind of futuristic technology familiar from sci-fi films, but touch screen tables, robot study buddies and 3D virtual learning environments could soon feature in the classroom.

The high-tech developments were highlighted at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences at the University of Sydney, which focused on the future of learning. The new approaches could be ”revolutionising our classes and the way children learn within five years”, Professor of Education at the university and conference co-chair, Peter Reimann, said.

Judy Kay, Professor of Computer Science at the university and a principal in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction team, has been developing software for interactive tabletops and wall displays.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/the-classroom-but-not-as-we-know-it-technology-to-revolutionise-schools-20120715-224ax.html#ixzz21EEvpHZn

Curiosity and Knowledge


What’s the Most Important Lesson You Learned from a Teacher?

Ed Yong

Ed Yong is an award-winning British science writer. His work has appeared in New Scientist, the Times, Wired, the Guardian, and Nature. He is the author of Not Exactly Rocket Science.

My science teacher, Keith Davies, used to teach me extra stuff in the interstitial moments of class practicals. Though I was still in primary school, I was learning secondary-level science because he never blanched at the prospect of a precocious student asking lots of questions. Mr. Davies taught me that curiosity would be rewarded with knowledge. What better preparation for a scientific life could there be?

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