Den Berliner Mauerweg entlang


http://www.dw.com/embed/640/av-18702933

By 1960, the combination of World War II and the massive emigration westward left East Germany with only 61% of its population of working age, compared to 70.5% before the war.[37] The loss was disproportionately heavy among professionals: engineers, technicians, physicians, teachers, lawyers and skilled workers.[37] The direct cost of manpower losses to East Germany (and corresponding gain to the West) has been estimated at $7 billion to $9 billion, with East German party leader Walter Ulbricht later claiming that West Germany owed him $17 billion in compensation, including reparations as well as manpower losses.[37] In addition, the drain of East Germany’s young population potentially cost it over 22.5 billion marks in lost educational investment.[40] The brain drain of professionals had become so damaging to the political credibility and economic viability of East Germany that the re-securing of the German communist frontier was imperative.[41]

The barrier was built slightly inside East Berlin or East German territory to ensure that it did not encroach on West Berlin at any point. Later, it was built up into the Wall proper, the first concrete elements and large blocks being put in place on 17 August. During the construction of the Wall, National People’s Army (NVA) and Combat Groups of the Working Class (KdA) soldiers stood in front of it with orders to shoot anyone who attempted to defect. Additionally, chain fences, walls, minefields and other obstacles were installed along the length of East Germany’s western border with West Germany proper. A huge no man’s land was cleared to provide a clear line of fire at fleeing refugees.[46]

Aaron Swartz – The Network Transformation


TO CALL Aaron Swartz gifted would be to miss the point. As far as the internet was concerned, he was the gift. In 2001, aged just 14, he helped develop a new version of RSS feeds, which enable blog posts, articles and videos to be distributed easily across the web. A year later he was working with Sir Tim Berners-Lee, creator of the world wide web, and others on enhancing the internet through the Semantic Web, in which web-page contents would be structured so that the underlying data could be shared and reused across different online applications and endeavours. At the same time he was part of a team, composed of programmers like himself (albeit none quite as youthful), lawyers and policy wonks, that launched Creative Commons, a project that simplified information-sharing through free, easy-to-use copyright licences.

Most of this he did for little or no compensation. One exception was Reddit, though he later sounded almost contrite about the riches showered on him and his colleagues by Condé Nast, the publisher of Vogue and over a dozen other prominent lifestyle magazines, which bought the popular social news site in 2006. In any case, he wasn’t a good fit for corporate life, he said, and left a few months later—or, depending on whom you talk to, was asked to leave. But the cash did let him focus on his relentless struggle to liberate data for online masses to enjoy for free.

For although programming was his first love, campaigning was his true vocation. He co-founded Demand Progress, a group that rails against internet censorship and which played a prominent role in the online campaign last year that helped to scupper proposed anti-piracy legislation supported by Hollywood film studios and other content owners. HisGuerrilla Open Access Manifesto of 2008 presaged—and perhaps inspired—recent threats by academics to shun journals that charge readers for access.

Remembering Aaron Swartz, Honoring a Pioneer & Activist

How You Brake The Borders….



Prosthetic limbs are incredibly valuable to amputees because a prosthesis can help restore some of the capabilities lost with the amputated limb. Although prosthetic limbs have still not advanced to the point where they can rival the functionality provided by biological limbs, the capabilities they do provide can be significant. Great strides are being made each day in the field of prosthetics, and while great technological challenges remain, artificial limbs are becoming increasingly similar to real limbs.

How the ITU could put the internet behind closed doors.


English: 100 years International Telecommunica...

English: 100 years International Telecommunication Union Deutsch: 100 Jahre Internationale Fernmeldeunion :*Graphics by Lichtwitz :*Ausgabepreis: 40 Pfennig :*First Day of Issue / Erstausgabetag: 17. Mai 1965 :*Michel-Katalog-Nr: 476 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We love the internet.

And we’re guessing you do too. Think about all the awesome things it gives us: A vast communication network; innovative businesses; a platform to freely speak or challenge powerful governments; and hundreds and hundreds of hours of cat videos.

All this great stuff is available because the internet was designed in an open and inclusive way, with a multitude of voices being able to get a say on how it’s governed.

But the internet is in danger.

There’s a meeting between the world’s governments in a just a few weeks, and it could very well decide the future of the internet through a binding international treaty. It’s called the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), and it’s being organized by a government-controlled UN agency called the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

One Young World



The premier global forum for young people of leadership calibre. It manifests the reality of common humanity and the shared existence of all the peoples in one world, Its purpose is to connect and bring together the youngest, brightest and best and to ensure that their concerns, opinions and solutions are heard.

 

Canterbury couple turn bus into a new home


What a great concept; an idea and a necessity wonderfully transformed into reality. Totally love it. This is the future of housing. The way things are going…. wont be long. The big boys in the auto industry should learn a thing or two from this innovative and practical story. Wishing the couple all the best.
deshantor il y a 17 heures

Suu Kyi accepts Nobel Peace Prize


Nobel price


Her interview with John Simpson is marvelous. Despite years of being detained, her defiant and determined, yet gentle, forgiving and understanding, charisma will carry her through the path toward democracy.
Watch her talking in London
Such a dignified and wise woman. Our world is richer for having people like her around. I’m happy for the Burmese people this momentous day.
andromedacarina il y a 1 an Continue reading

Eckhart Tolle on Presence



One night in 1977, at the age of 29, after having suffered from long periods of suicidal depression, Tolle says he experienced an “inner transformation.”[7] That night he awakened from his sleep, suffering from feelings of depression that were “almost unbearable,” but then experienced a life-changing epiphany.[9]Recounting the experience, Tolle says,

I couldn’t live with myself any longer. And in this a question arose without an answer: who is the ‘I’ that cannot live with the self? What is the self? I felt drawn into a void! I didn’t know at the time that what really happened was the mind-made self, with its heaviness, its problems, that lives between the unsatisfying past and the fearful future, collapsed. It dissolved. The next morning I woke up and everything was so peaceful. The peace was there because there was no self. Just a sense of presence or “beingness,” just observing and watching.[11]

Tolle recalls going out for a walk in London the next morning, and finding that “everything was miraculous, deeply peaceful. Even the traffic.”[9] The feeling continued, and he began to feel a strong underlying sense of peace in any situation.[5] Tolle stopped studying for his doctorate, and for a period of about two years after this he spent much of his time sitting, “in a state of deep bliss,” on park benches in Russell Square, Central London, “watching the world go by.” He stayed with friends, in a Buddhist monastery, or otherwiseslept rough on Hampstead Heath. His family thought him “irresponsible, even insane.”[11] Tolle changed his first name from Ulrich to Eckhart, by some reports in homage to the German philosopher and mystic,Meister Eckhart,[6][8][12] by other reports he was drawn to that name coincidentally.[13]